Aug 30, 2020

Mining industry muscles in on election campaign

Mining industry muscles in on election campaign

The Queensland Resources Council has launched an unprecedented four-week media campaign in the lead-up to the State election.

The QRC says the aim is to push home the economic and job creation importance of the mining and gas industry to the State’s COVID-19 recovery.

It has been pushing for a royalty freeze and action to cut the ‘red tape’ and ‘green tape’ holding up mining projects.

QRC chief executive Ian Macfarlane said the campaign was in response to worsening economic conditions, with Queensland’s unemployment rate the nation’s highest at 8.8 per cent, and the resources industry’s potential to strengthen and speed up the State’s recovery.

“Resources offer incredible economic stability, jobs and growth and the Premier has acknowledged our sector is one of Queensland’s greatest strengths, yet we’ve had barriers put in place by Government to new investment and more jobs in the resources sector with little consultation or warning,” he said.

“Frankly, the time it takes to get projects moving in Queensland these days and to get through all the red and green tape is ridiculous.

“We can be stronger, and Queensland can be stronger, but we need a shared commitment and unwavering support from the Government.”

The QRC wants the State Government to streamline the regulation process and keep royalty taxes stable for the next 10 years to attract large-scale global investment.

Mr Macfarlane said the industry had proven over decades to be an excellent return on investment for the Queensland Government, now contributing $74 billion each year to the State’s economy and supporting 372,000 full-time jobs.

“On top of that, resources delivers the Government more than $5 billion a year in royalty taxes, which go straight into the State Budget to pay for roads, hospitals, teachers and nurses.

“We want people to keep this in mind when they vote for our next State Government on October 31,” Mr Macfarlane said.

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